We welcome the faithful, the seeker, and the doubter

for God’s embrace is wide and God’s good news is for all.

Welcome to St. Alban’s

Bienvenido a San Alban

A Message from our Rector

AUGUST 2014

Beloved in Christ,

From the time of the Reformation, the Anglican tradition (of which we are a part) has been a people of the book: specifically, of the Book of Common Prayer. While other Reformation traditions organized themselves around a set of common doctrines, we chose to be a people of disparate theological understandings who were united by the practice of common prayer. This allowed us to place our common love of Christ and of our neighbor ahead of any human teaching, the best of which are, at most, partial insights into the God who always exceeds our understanding.

What is common prayer? There are two ways to look at it. In its narrowest sense, it is what we do when two or three are gathered in Christ’s name, praying together. But our tradition also has a much wider understanding: because we all pray from the same book, we are united in spirit not only with those who are physically present to us, but also with Christians all over the world who pray the same words, read the same Scriptures, and share the same Sacrament, and we are also united with and through the Spirit of God. Thus, our little Morning Prayer service is united with daily prayer services throughout the Anglican Communion, and our Sunday worship is part of the act by which Christians in every corner of the world are tasting the Body and Blood of Christ.

Recently, we have decided to shift our Morning Prayer services a bit to capture more of the fulness of this truth. On most Monday mornings, we will pray from the 1662 Book of Common Prayer, which is still the authorized book in England and in many other parts of the Communion. On Tuesday through Friday, we will pray Rite II. On Thursdays, we will incorporate some of the inclusive-language canticles that were most recently approved by General Convention. This spectrum should expose us to the full breadth of understanding that is part of our tradition.

We are also going to institute a parish cycle of prayer at Morning Prayer, in which each member of our parish is prayed for by name at least twice a year. This will be in addition to intercessions for people who are sick or in trouble or who have specifically requested them, and will allow us to hold each of you up in God’s grace simply as an expression of our love for you. As you are going about your day, take a few moments yourself to pray for the parishioner who has been a grace to you, or the one you find frustrating, or the first-time visitor you just met. We never know what burdens the most ordinary person is carrying, or what good we may do by quietly holding someone up in blessings. We rest in Jesus’ promise that “our Father knows what we need before we ask him.” (Matt 6:8) Thanks be to God.

Blessings,

Deborah Meister signature

 

 Click here for past messages from our Rector

Focus on Feeding

Hunger

One in eight District households is struggling against hunger. We invite you to prayerfully consider whether you can help one of St. Alban’s three feeding ministries. You can find more information on our Ministries page.

Find out more

Upcoming Events

  • 12 days left
  • The annual All-Foyers Potluck Dinner will be September 13. Foyers is a fellowship ministry in which, from late fall to early summer, groups of eight t[...]
  • 12 days left
  • Are you caring for a family member and would like additional support?  We are convening a meeting on September 14, 10:30 a.m. in St. David's Room, 2nd[...]
  • 19 days left
  • Join the 9th annual Unity Walk from Washington Hebrew Congregation to the Ghandi Memorial on Sunday, Sept. 21 - or volunteer to help. A vibrant remind[...]